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Ancestors - 

Revolutionary War





James Vaughn

James Vaughn was my 5th Great Grandfather on my Father's side of my family.

James Vaughn was born about 1745 in Southern Virginia in what was then Brunswick County. At the time of the Revolution, he was living in the newly formed Mecklenburg, County. On the 19th of February 1776, he enlisted for two years in the 4th Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army and serving in Capt. John Brent's Company commanded by Col. Robert Lawson and in Capt. Jason Riddick Co. commanded by Col. Thomas Elliott. The 4th Va. Regiment joined Washington's Army late in 1776 and Vaughn participated in the winter battles of Trenton and Princeton. In the fall of 1777 James was with Washington’s Army at the battles at Brandywine and Germantown before spending the winter of 1778 at Valley Forge, Pa. James was discharged on the 19th of February 1778 after his two year enlistment was complete.

John Hancher

John Hancher was my 4th Great Grandfather on my Mother’s side of my family.

The birth year of John Hancher is not know with absolute certainty but given that his first son William was born about 1760, he was certain to have been born before 1740 but was not listed along with his father on the Frederick County tax list of 1757 indicating he was likely less than 21 at that date. His parents were Nicholas and Rebecca Hancher/Henshaw. They were married in Philadelphia in 1726 and moved to Frederick County Va. in the late 1730’s.

In 1766 John received a land grant from Lord Fairfax for 172 acres in what is now Berkley County and in 1780 an additional 110 acres which must have adjoined as the land left in his will totaled 193 acres.

John married Sarah Caudy, daughter of the famous frontiersman and Indian fighter James Caudy. The rock formation "Caudy's Castle" in Hampshire County West Virginia is named for James. They were the parents of eleven children.

John enlisted in the 12th Regiment Virginia Continental line in March of 1777 serving at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown before wintering with the army at Valley Forge. He was listed as wounded on the 13th of October 1777. The would apparently suffered at either Brandywine in September or Germantown on the 4th of October. During November and December he was listed as on Guard duty. In June he was listed on the rolls of the 4th Virginia where he remained until listed on the rolls of the 8th Regiment until he was discharged in March 1779 after two years of service.

 John Hancher died in 1793 in Berkley County Virginia.

Nicholas Henshaw/Hancher 

The spelling of Nicholas’ surname appears alternately thru historical records of Virginia as Hinshaw/Henshaw/Hanshaw/Hancher and a variety of other spellings.

Nicholas Hancher was my 5th Great Grandfather on my Father’s side of my family.

There is much speculation on the ancestry of Nicholas Henshaw/Hancher but only the following information seems to have supporting documentation.

The first records of Nicholas are from the property tax listings for Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania. From 1725 through 1735 his taxes ranged from 1 shilling 3 pence to 2 shillings. Spellings of his surname varied from Hanshaw, Handshaw, Hindshaw, and Hansher. These tax records show that Nicholas lived among Quakers, but his name is never included in their signature logs. He lived next door in Nottingham to Henry Reynolds, Jr., two years older than Nicholas, whose father came from England in 1676. Henry¹s wife was a Brown. Nicholas married Rebecca Boulware Smith on 3 November 1726 in the Church of England’s Christ Church, Philadelphia. Rebecca apparently was a Quaker as she attended two Quaker weddings in Nottingham. One was a Brown marrying a Harris, and the other, a Harris. They were invited by Henry Reynolds, but Nicholas’ signature does not appear on these Quaker logs.

It is speculated that their first son, John, was born in 1734 but records do not show him on the taxable list of 1757 an indication he may not have been of age (21) at that time. On 21 March 1735, Nicholas Henshaw requested and received a land warrant for 150 acres "whereon He has been several years settled," however, there is no record for a land sale.

The first indication we have that Nicholas and his family were interested in moving to Virginia, appears on 19 September 1737 when Rebecca was granted a certificate for Hopewell, VA, from Nottingham, PA, and on 21 May 1739, Nicholas Hanshaw was received at Hopewell, from Nottingham.

A few years later, the Morgan Chapel records show the births of two Hinshaw children: William Hinshaw on 2 May 1743 and Hannah Hinshaw on 18 March 1746. It seems logical that Nicholas remained true to his Church of England, as it was Rebecca who had the known Quaker connections. The Morgan Chapel later became Christ Episcopal Church of Bunker Hill, where a large number of the Henshaw family worshipped and were buried. However, the several accounts of the Quaker activities at Hopewell show that many members of the family did participate in Quaker activities, as one by one were rejected by the Hopewell Meeting. The following are just a few examples: On 20 August 1759 - John (son of Nicholas and Rebecca Smith Hancher, husband of Sarah Caudy) was Condemned for marrying out of Unity. Hannah Hancher Berry (daughter of Nicholas and Rebecca Smith Hancher) was disowned for marrying out of Unity on 4 January 1762, and on 5 April 1762 William (son of Nicholas and Rebecca Smith Hancher) was condemned for assisting his sister to marry out of Unity.

Nicholas is listed as having served as a Lieutenant in Captain Hugh Stephens' Regiment at the first call of troops in 1775 and among those in the battle of Point Pleasant in 1774.

Nicholas Henshaw died Aug 19 1777, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Virginia.

Peter David 

  Peter David was my 6th Great Grandfather on my Father's side of my family.

“Pierre” Peter David , also Davie, was born October 8 1710 in the Parish of St. Martins, London, England. He was the son of Pierre David of Bolbec in Normandy, France and Anne Dutertre whose family was originally from Orleans, France. His parents immigrated to America in 1714, where in March of 1715, his father received a land grant of eighty-eight acres along the James River, at the French Huguenot settlement in Henrico County, Virginia. The settlement became part of Goochland County when it was formed in the late 1720’s. Peter Sr. died in 1730, leaving the land for the use of his widow Anne who held it until 1744 when she and her son Peter Jr. sold it. The same year, Peter bought two parcels of land totaling 387 acres in Goochland County and continued to live among the Huguenots, serving as a vestryman and Church warden as had his father. 

  By 1766 he had sold all this property, now located in Cumberland County and moved further west to Buckingham County where he lived until after his service in the Continental Army.

  On February 12 1776 the 14th Virginia Regiment, which had been authorized the previous fall as part of the Continental Army, was organized to consist of ten companies from Halifax, Pittsylvania, Hanover, Bedford, Albemarle, Fincastle, Dinwiddie, Prince George, Goochland, Louisa, Charlotte, and Lunenburg Counties. The Regiment was to become part of the 2ndth Division Virginia troops. Brigade, 5.

  On the 18th of February Peter David enlisted in Capt. John Marks Company of the 14th Regiment. He was appointed Quartermaster Officer three months later on May 22nd 1777. He served in that capacity during the campaigns of that fall and through the difficult winter at Valley Forge. The Regiment entered Valley Forge with 288 men assigned and 118 fit for duty. The Regiment left Valley Forge with 408 assigned and 225 fit for duty. Peter David resigned his position with the Continental Army On October 31st 1778 at the age of 68 after almost twenty-one months of continuous service.

  In 1780, Peter David was granted 259 acres in Pittsylvania CountyHenry County Virginia and his will was proved November 25th 1785. undoubtedly for his service during the war. He died in Henry County Virginia and his will was proved November 25th 1785.

  Peter David married Elizabeth Morrissette on or about July 01, 1737 in Goochland County Virginia. She was the daughter of Pierre Morrissette and Elizabeth Faure both of who had immigrated with their parents and the Huguenot settlers to Virginia in 1701.  She was born March 1, 1721 in Mannikintown, Va. The Union produced ten children, three boys and seven girls all reaching adulthood and each being named in Peter’s will made in 1781 and which named his wife Elizabeth and son Isaac as executors.

 

Isaac David

 Isaac David was my 5th Great Grandfather on my Father’s side of my family. 

He was born May 30, 1756 in King William Parish, then Cumberland County, Virginia, now Powhatan County, Virginia.  His parents were Peter David and Elizabeth Morrisett.  As a child he moved to Buckingham County, Virginia where he grew to maturity and married Mildred White about 1775.  She was the daughter of Henry White and Celia Page.  Around 1780 ISAAC and his family moved to Henry County, Virginia onto land he was granted by the state of Virginia.  Late in 1787, Isaac and Milly sold the land and moved to a tract on the South Fork of the Broad River, then in Wilkes County, Georgia and now in both Madison County, Georgia and Oglethorpe County, Georgia.  Milly died and on February 26, 1798 and Isaac remarried to Susannah Vaughn, widow of James Vaughn a Revolutionary Veteran who had settled in Oglethorpe County in the early 1790’s.  Isaac raised to maturity ten children of his own and seven children of his second wife as well as the three children of his son Henry who died at about 30 years of age. He was active in Millstone Baptist Church in Oglethorpe County, Georgia where he was chosen as a deacon of Millstone Church and ordained on March 31, 1804. He died April 17, 1840 having accumulated a substantial estate.

Isaac David is a recognized Revolutionary War Patriot having furnished 300 lbs of beef to the American Revolutionary Army according to Public Claims, Henry Co Virginia, Booklet, Reg C 5520, Virginia State Library, Richmond. He served as a private in the Virginia Militia from Henry County under the command of Capt. Critz. They began their march from Beaver Creek on March 11, 1781, marched to the assistance of General Green at Guilford’s Court House and took part in the battle there on March 25, 1781. This Company was later at Eutaw Springs and finally they were at the surrender at Yorktowne on Oct. 19, 1781.

 

 James Davison

James Davison or Davidson was my 4th Great Grandfather on my Father's side of my family.

James Davidson came to Big Moccasin Creek in the very earliest times with his father, also James Davidson, and his brothers Joseph and John. His maternal grandfather, David Edwards had also come and had died in the spring of 1778. At this time, the area was part of Fincastle County. In 1777 this area would become part of Washington County, as it was formed from Fincastle, and later part of Russell County and still later part of it would become Scott County. The associated families lived near Houston's Fort on Big Moccasin Creek near what was to be forty years later, the line between Scott and Russell. With the passing of the elder James Davidson in June 1794, James Jr. would come to be known as James, Sr. When Russell County was formed in 1785, James Davison and his friend Robert Tate would sign the petition and the next year both appointed officers of the Militia, Davison as Captain and Tate as Lieutenant.

Both men had previously served in Capt. James Thompson’s Militia from Fincastle during Lord

Dunmore’ War. The war was a conflict between the Colony of Virginia and the Native Americans of the Ohio Valley. Following increased raids and attacks on frontiersmen in this region, the Royal Governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, organized a large force of militia and marched to Fort Pitt arriving at the end of August 1774. Dunmore also ordered Colonel Andrew Lewis, commander of the southwestern Virginia militia, to raise an army in the south and meet Dunmore’s force along the Ohio River. Lewis formed militia companies from Augusta, Bedford, Botetourt, Culpeper, Dunmore, Fincastle, and Kentucky counties. After Colonel Lewis’ victory at the Battle of Point Pleasant, Dunmore successfully negotiated a peace treaty with the Delaware, Mingo, and Shawnee chiefs that prevented them from settling or hunting south of the Ohio River.

In the fall of 1780, James Davison would be among the Overmountain men who marched from Sycamore Shoals to King’s Mountain to confront the British Commander Patrick Ferguson and his army of Tories. The following statement, given by James Davison in 1824, describes what he witnessed during the victory at King’s Mountain.

14 April, 1824

On the 7th day of October 1780 the battle of King’s mountain was fought in which I was in Colo CAMPBELL’S regiment of Virginia Militia,  just before the battle commenced Colo CAMPBELL ordered us to dismount, raise the indian  helpers [?] and rush up he mountain as we did so when the firing soon commenced and as we advanced towards the top the Enemy poured upon us a heavy fire  and we retreated some distance back but were rallied and drove the Enemy back and along the mountain to their waggons [sic] and a little distance beyond the wagons on the turn of the mountain where the Enemy surrendered at which time I was not more as near I think than thirty yards from them. I stepped up immediately to the Enemy where they were begging quarters and Struck [?] down their arms I distinctly remember to see Colo CAMPBELL dashing about through his own man and the Enemy taking measure to secure the prisoners, and pretty soon had a quard placed around them,  at that time Colo CAMPBELL was in his shirtsleeves and his Collar open – I remember this fact distinctly from seeing CAMPBEL rushing about so actively, sometimes amongst the Enemy, and sometimes amongst his prisoners as we were all driven up into a huddle when the Enemy were ordered to set down that they might be distinquished as others from us as we were dressed alike except the red coats-

      I remember Colo McDOWELL who we met at the rendezvous on Watauga and  would  suppose he was then about thirty five or fouty years old as he apeared to be an active smart man of about ordinary stature.                                                       

James Davison

Robert Tate of Russell County Virginia 

Robert Tate was my 4th Great Grandfather on my Father’s side of my family.

Robert Tate Jr. was born about 1745 in what then was Augusta County, Virginia in the area later to become Fincastle County and still later Washington County and Russell County. He was the son of Robert Tate Sr. His mother is reported to have been named Margaret.

Robert Tate married Mary, reported by some as McCline, and the union produced at least seven children who are mentioned in Robert’s will written in 1796 and executed in February of 1807. Robert apparently died in 1806 or early 1807. He was alive in 1799 as indicated by land records.

Robert Tate Jr. received a land grant of 174 acres in Fincastle, County, Virginia on December 13, 1774 on Big Moccasin Creek, North Fork of Holston River. On April 20, 1784 he received a land patent of 250 acres in Washington County, Va on both sides of Big Moccasin Creek on a spur of Clinch Mountain on the Holston River some three miles from Col. John Tate.

When Russell County was formed in 1785, Robert Tate and his friend James Davison would sign the petition and the next year both appointed officers of the Militia, Davison as Captain and Tate as Lieutenant.

Both men had previously served in Capt. James Thompson’s Militia from Fincastle during Lord

Dunmore’ War. The war was a conflict between the Colony of Virginia and the Native Americans of the Ohio Valley. Following increased raids and attacks on frontiersmen in this region, the Royal Governor of Virginia, Lord Dunmore, organized a large force of militia and marched to Fort Pitt arriving at the end of August 1774. Dunmore also ordered Colonel Andrew Lewis, commander of the southwestern Virginia militia, to raise an army in the south and meet Dunmore’s force along the Ohio River. Lewis formed militia companies from Augusta, Bedford, Botetourt, Culpeper, Dunmore, Fincastle, and Kentucky counties. After Colonel Lewis’ victory at the Battle of Point Pleasant, Dunmore successfully negotiated a peace treaty with the Delaware, Mingo, and Shawnee chiefs that prevented them from settling or hunting south of the Ohio River.

Robert Tate is listed among the Overmountain men who marched from Sycamore Shoals to King’s Mountain to confront the British Commander Patrick Ferguson and his army of Tories.

DAR Patriot Lookup

A search of our Patriot Index provided the information found below.

TATE,   Robert

Birth:     Circa 1745

Service:  VA

Rank:  CS PS

Death:  VA 1806 Will Executed 03 February 1807

Patriot Pensioned:   No     Widow Pensioned:   No

Children Pensioned:   No     Heirs Pensioned:   No

Spouse:  (1) Mary X

Francis Power 

Francis Power was my 5th Great Grandfather on my Father's side of my family.

Francis Power, Revolutionary Soldier, enlisted Jan 3, 1776, in the 3rd Co, 14th Regiment, under Col John Glover, Esq.

Also had service in the Company of Militia from Bedford Co. Va. under Capt. Adam Clements in North Carolina in May 1781.

Jacob Slagle

Jacob Slagle was my 3rd Great Grandfather on my Mother's side of my family.

Jacob Slagle Pvt. under Lieut. Collier, 13th PA Line and in the York County Militia.  Served as a teamster.


Archibald Burden

Archibald Burden was my 5th Great Grandfather on my Father’s side of my family.

Archibald E. Burden was born in 1745 in Amherst Co., VA. He died in 1806. He was buried in Burden Cemetery; Elbert Co., Georgia. He married Hannah Goad about 1770.

He is listed in the journal of the House of Delegates, dated 1778.

In 1783, he is listed as the head of the family with nine white souls in his household in Amherst, Virginia. The Burdens are believed to have come to Elbert County between 1785 and 1790. They settled in that part of Wilkes County, which later became Elbert County, and more specifically near Bowman, Ga.
Archibald E. Burden is listed in the Historical Registrar of Virginians in the Revolution. His service was in the militia with few specifics available. He was given land grants in Elbert Co, Ga. for his service in the Revolutionary War. Elbert Co. Ga. land grants card file states Archibald Barden given 200 acres on 17 January 1779 Bk. Z-4 page 173. Also Archibald Burden, Elbert Co., 41 acres in 1793 page 134 in Book Index. Archibald Burden, Jr., Capt. Elbert Co., June 7, 1820 - May 6, 1823 MR 1808-1829 page 55 from GA. archives card file. Archebald Burden land lottery eligible 2 draws August 5, 1806 under Captain Thomas Oliver. 1820 census Archibald in Elbert Co., Ga. The different spellings for his name were as in record

Arabella Smith Wilkins

Arabella Smith Wilkins was my 6th Great Grandmother on my Father's side of my family.

She is recognized as a Revolutionary Patriot for providing support to the Revolution as evidenced by the Virginia Revolutionary War Public Service Claims. She was the widow of James Wilkins and the mother of Susannah Wilkins who was married to James Vaughn another of my Revolutionary Ancestors. 

James Wilkins 

James Wilkins, was my 6th Great-Grandfather on my father’s side of the family. He was born about 1730 in Lunenburg County, Virginia and died before 8 October 1781 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia. He was the son of John Wilkins and Mary Kimbrough. He married Arabella Smith 20 June 1751 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. She was the daughter of Luke Smith and Arabella Gromarrin. Arabella is also a recognized Revolutionary War Patriot having supported the war effort after the death of her husband.

Before his death, James Wilkins was a Captain in the Virginia Militia, Mecklenburg First Battalion and provided Patriotic Service.